The Sedona show

I’ve already blogged about my positive experiences with Carré d’artistes fine art galleries. Here is another reason why I like to work with them. After returning home from Sedona this came in the mail.


I lovely note signed by wonderful people. And two brushes. A thoughtful follow up.

 Painting isn’t an effort, it is a pleasure and I am lucky to call myself a professional painter. Lucky also to work with Carré d’artistes. They know how to make their artists feel desirable. 

I managed to take in the sights and photograph the Bell Rock vortex. Hiking wasn’t on my agenda. But I did meditate and saw the magic. There are lots of faces on that rock.

The show had a good turnout despite the outrageous heat. It was 49 degrees in Phoenix, and 37 in Sedona. 

I made the trip to Flagstaff and found my father’s tomb. Afternoon wandering around the cemetery for over an hour and being dive bombed by crows I asked for a sign.  This was the sign. It was on top of the tomb. No idea who put it there.


Thank you to all of you who contributed to The Indiegogo campaign. And thank you Cate Stetson for the wonderful meals.

Open Studio in Sedona, Arizona

Two weeks from today, Saturday June 17th, my palette knife and I will be in Sedona, Arizona. Painting at the Carré d’artistes fine art gallery in the Tlaquepaque Arts & Crafts Village.

I want to thank all the wonderful family and friends who contritubed to my Indiegogo campaign. You helped my buy my plane tickets and some taco lunches. I can’t wait to eat some fine Mexican food. Paris boasts great food but Tacos are hard to find.

This trip is a big deal for me. Not only the painting exibition but also my personal quest. In the past five months I painted 80 small format paintings for the gallery and 15 large ones. I’m ready to fly and enjoy the Southwest energy.

Here is an underpainting, how I start my paintings. It’s what you’ll see if you arrive early on Saturday. Not this exact image but it gives you an idea of how I work. I used to prime my canvases with a flat color then paint alla-prima. Now I do underpaintings. Lots of people wonder if this is watercolor. It’s not. It is very diluted oil. I like the drips.

Snoopy Rock underpainting
An underpainting, done in oil wash on canvas

Fly me to Sedona

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On June 17th I’ll be in Sedona, Arizona for a live painting demonstration. To help pay for my expenses I’ve put up a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. Here is the link

Fly Me to Sedona

I’m hoping to raise just $750 to help buy my plane tickets.

My total expenses will be over $2000 for the four day trip.

One of the perks I’m offering is a postcard-sized watercolor of Sedona’s famous Bell Rock. I’ll write whatever you want and send from Sedona to anywhere in the world. This could be a fun surprise for a friend.

I’m also offering painting workshops, limited edition lithographs, and some original paintings.

If you’ll be in Sedona on Saturday June 17th come see me paint at the

Tlaquepaque Arts & Crafts Village
336 State Route 179, Suite B121
86336 Sedona, Arizona
Tél. : 928-282-8704
Email : sedona@carredartistes.com

Here are some of the large paintings that will befor sale at the gallery.  All are oil on canvas.

 

100x100HeavenAndRock700
Heavan and Rock, 100x100cm, oil on canvas
80x80-CanyonLands
Canyonlands, 80x80cm, oil on canvas
50x50Painted-Medows
Painted Meadows, 50x50cm oil on canvas
50x50Love is a Pinto Pony
Love is a Pinto Pony, 50x50cm, oil on canvas
50x50-Cliffs
Cliffs 50x50cm
40x120-When the Valley is Blue
When the Valley is Blue, 40x120cm
100x100Canyon-de-Chelly
Canyon de Chelley, 100x100cm
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Pink Time, 80×80 cm, oil on canvas, ©2017 Angie Brooksby-Arcangioli

Grand Canyon Love

original oil painting of the Grand Canyon by Angie Brooksby-Arcangioli
Grand Canyon Love: 80×80 cm , oil on canvas , 2017 Angie Brooksby-Arcangioli

After the sad decision made by  officials in Washington D.C. to sell the United States national parks I am pouring love into every brushstoke. All the paintings I make for my upcoming show in Sedona will be pure love. Gobs of love from my palette to the canvas.
I hope this view will not be spoiled by greed. Condominiums or a hotel.

I will miss this painting when it goes to a happy client’s home. The illusion of distance is a window in my Parisian living room. It is my favorite so far for the Southwest series.

It leaves next week to go to Carré d’artistes Sedona gallery. I’ll be there June 17th and will do a live painting demonstration. All the way from Paris, France.

My atelier today

paintingsofsedonabyangiebrooksbyYesterday I prepared four new oil paintings of the Southwest. The underpaintings look like watercolors. They are watery, almost drippy. The spots on the floor are proof.

I tend to paint high contrast. See the painting on the shelf, on the right? It’s unfinished. I need to add highlights and details. But it is high contrast.

While studying sculpture at the Maryland Institute College of Art, one of my professers — the infamous Art Benson— suggested I photograph my sculptures and contemplate the next step. The photograph removed me from the slapdash creative moment.

It was good advice. At the time I didn’t  follow much advice.

As I look at the paintings here, on my blog, I see how to proceed in a new way. Less overall contrast could give a dreamy quality, almost illustrative.

I wonder if I am capable of painting with lest contrast. Hmm.

40 more paintings for Sedona

Paintings of the American South West by Angie Brooksby
Paintings of the American South West by Angie Brooksby

To date this year I’ve painted 333 oil paintings. That’s more that twice I did last year. One of my favorites is the on the bottom left in this photo.

When I lived and worked in Florence, Italy I painted like this. Like a possessed fiend.  It feels great to work so much and know that people want my artworks.

These are going to Carré d’Artistes Sedona gallery. I hope they get there for black Friday.

 

 

 

My paintings in Sedona, Arizona

original oil painting of Sedona Arizona by Angie Brooksby
original oil painting of Sedona Arizona by Angie Brooksby
Pink Light – 36×36 cm – oil on canvas ©2016 Angie Brooksby

I forgot to announce that my paintings went up on September 30th in Carré d’Artistes Sedona gallery. When they invited me to paint for the Sedona gallery I hesitated. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to. I’d been painting cityscapes of Paris for the last nine years. Several conincidences made me decide, yes.

The word Arizona kept popping up in unexpected places. For instance I was jogging through Luxembourg Gardens and saw a poster of the Grand Canyon. It was publicity for an exhibition at the Palais de l’Eau in Paris. I went to the exhibition and walked all the way back, along the Seine. That day I took excellent photos for the next series of Paris paintings I am planning.

Other things happened but Arizona was on my mind. When I was a child we went often to Arizona, driving through the Painted Desert. Everytime I saw a cactus, I had to touch it. My mother spent hours plucking needles out of my soft skin.

It’s funny how life brings you full circle.

One of my mannequins is for sale at Carre d’Artistes Sedona gallery, here is a photo from Instagram.

The first forty paintings I did seem to be flying out the door.

I wish I was in Sedona this week to see the plein air painters. There are some excellent artists at work. Check out the website for the festival: Sedona Plein Air Festival.

Painting onsite is so much fun. I painted Tuscany for 20 years before moving to Paris.

If you want to see what I’m painting, check my instagram feed up on the top right.

 

40 paintings for Sedona 

oil painting of Grand Canyon by Angie Brooksby

I began painting these on 8 August. Seeing them like this makes me feel as though it was not much work. It would be hard to calculate the number of individual brushstrokes. In October they will be available at the Carre d’artistes gallery in Sedona.

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Three of these are homages to other artists.

This is one of my favorites. That’s a road not a river.

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This one was a bit of a puzzle. Tiny brushstrokes to create distance. Tiny brushstrokes everywhere.

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Here are some of the larger sizes. Two of these are homages to other painters.

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Because of the limited palette this little one is my favorite out of the forty.

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Some of the smaller ones.

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The audio books I listened to while painting are:

  • The Birth of Classical Europe by Simon Price read by Don Hagan
    • The Brexit results got me questioning the origins of Europe. The massacre in Nice on Bastille day (the equivalent of the USA 4th of July) made me wonder why the Islamic state wants to dominate the planet. I needed to know more about how and when cults came across the continent. Simon Price’s tome raises many questions about how history is studied. I liked that he presents theories and explains why they may contradict eachother. He explains contexts of events and how history was interpreted by our ancestors. Noteworthy to my question is the Assyrian empire — 2300 years before the birth of Christ and 2700 years before Mohammed supposedly lived. It was interesting to me to know that for nearly 5000 years there has been war around the Mediterrenean.
  • Ancient Egypt by Anthony Holmes read by Jonathan Keebe
    • A micro dose of basic history read in one hour
  • The Island of the Sequined Love Nun by Christopher Moore
    • Moore is one of my favorite authors. I needed some tragic comedy.
  • Napolean in a Nutshell by Neil Wenborn
    • Another mini history. No doubt Nap was one kickass dude. More warring in the Mediterranean, Europe and the middle East.
  • The Mental Floss History of the World by Steve Wiegand and Erik Sass read by my favorite voice artist Johnny Heller
    • Highly recommended. It’s irreverent and informative. It includes silly but very intersting facts like the invention of the condom, firecrackers and more. It’s definitely one of my all time favorite books. A  quote quoted from Democlytes, “Good times lead to complacency and weekness.”

No doubt the last few generations of western cultures have lived good times. We are complacent and weak. It’s time to wake up and take responsibility for the humanitarian crisis we have allowed our leaders to create.